mote-historie:

Fashion models working in Florence, Italy

August 1951

Photo by Milton Greene

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Sherlock Holmes Stories + Text posts

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sherlock-undercover:

"He is your glass of tea?" - The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970)

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toxicnotebook:

Illustrator Sunday: J.C. Leyendecker (Part Two)

I took your silence as ‘no one would mind’.

Scanned from the Culter & Culter J.C. Leyendecker book.

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Grantaire had risen. The immense gleam of the whole combat which he had missed, and in which he had had no part, appeared in the brilliant glance of the transfigured drunken man.

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#les mis  

We meet ourselves time and again in a thousand disguises on the path of life.

Carl Jung (via redy)

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Harold Lloyd in A Sailor-Made Man (1922)

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chaplinfanage:

Charlie Chaplin in the early 1910’s?

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dadsamoviecritic:

Gregory Peck as ‘Atticus Finch’ in classic  ”To Kill A Mockingbird”

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homotography:

Salvador Dali by Carl Van Vechten

(via firebombing)

ephemeral-elegance:

Machine Embroidered Jacket, ca. 1890s

Owned by Jessie Mason Webb

via NDSU

(via cryptovolans)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg

Guardians

In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.

1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum

2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum

3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery

4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum

5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery

6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum

7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum

8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum

9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery

10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery

I’m so sorry

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Photography by: Gladys Ng

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